Berkley Hudson

Associate Professor

321-B Lee Hills Hall
Missouri School of Journalism
Columbia, MO 65211-1200

Phone:
573-882-4201
E-mail:

For 25 years a magazine and newspaper writer and editor, BERKLEY HUDSON teaches in the magazine journalism emphasis area. His course areas include intermediate and advanced writing and the literature of journalism as well as a mass media seminar.

In 2012 he began a three-year term as editor-in-chief of Visual Communication Quarterly, an international, peer-reviewed journal published by the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) in partnership with Taylor & Francis.

His research interests center on American media history, visual studies, interviewing, media representation of racial conflict and narrative journalism. His dissertation focused on the “photobiography” of a Mississippi town in the early and mid-twentieth century, illuminating issues of identity, culture and history.

Since 2006, he has had a permanent research appointment as a special curator of the O.N. Pruitt Collection, The Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Previously Hudson was a staff writer for the Los Angeles Times, the Providence (R.I.) Journal and The Bulletin in Bend, Ore. He edited the Providence Sunday Journal Magazine. Hudson’s freelance writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine, Mother Jones, Hemispheres and Historic Preservation.

Hudson has taught at the University of Rhode Island and the California State University at Fullerton and at Los Angeles. Hudson earned an undergraduate degree in history and journalism at the University of Mississippi, a master’s in journalism at Columbia University, and a doctorate in mass communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

He also served as director of The Storytelling Project of the Cotsen Children’s Library of Los Angeles and affiliated with Princeton University. This archival and documentary project resulted in 180 hours of digital video recordings of interviews and performances by more than 90 storytellers from cultures across the United States, including ones in Hawaii, the Navajo Reservation, and Georgia’s Sea Islands.

Book Chapters

  • Hudson, B. & Hinnant, A. (2011). “The Magazine Revolution, 1880-1920,” in “The Oxford History of U.S. Popular Print Culture.” ed. Christine Bold, University of Guelph. New York: Oxford University Press. (In press.)
  • Hudson, B. (2008) “Foreign Voices Yearning to Breathe Free: The Early Twentieth-Century Immigrant Press in the United States,” in Journalism 1908: Birth of a Profession, ed. Betty Winfield. University of Missouri Press.

Encyclopedia Entries

  • Hudson, B. “Birney Imes, Photographer,” Mississippi Encyclopedia. University Press of Mississippi. (In press).
  • Hudson, B. (2009). “Photojournalists: Biographies,” in The Encyclopedia of Journalism, ed. Christopher H. Sterling. Sage Publications.
  • Hudson, B. (2008). “William Grant Still,” in The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Bill Malone and Charles Reagan Wilson, eds., Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press. See earlier version in the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, William Ferris and Charles Reagan Wilson, eds., Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina 1989, 1088-1089.
  • Hudson, B. (2006) “Medgar Evers” in The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Charles Reagan Wilson, ed. Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 2006, vol. 3, 287-288. See earlier version in the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, William Ferris and Charles Reagan Wilson, eds., 1989, 207-208.
  • Hudson, B. (1989).“Casey Jones,” The Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, William Ferris and Charles Reagan Wilson, eds., Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina, 508-509.

Refereed Publications

  • Hudson, B. (Winter 2009). “To Privilege the Visual: An Alternative Approach to Media History.” American Journalism, 26(1).
  • Hudson, B. & Townsend, R. (2009) “Unraveling the Webs of Influence and Intimacy: Harper’s Magazine and Willie Morris, 1967-1971.” Literary Journalism Studies, 1(2).
  • Hudson. B. & Ostman, R. (2009) “A Desire to End These Things: An Analytical History of John L. Spivak’s Photographic Portrayal of 1930s Georgia Chain Gangs.” Visual Communication Quarterly, 16(4).
  • Hudson, B. & Boyajy, K. (August 2009). “The Rise and Fall of an Ethnic Advocate and American Huckster: Louis N. Hammerling and the Immigrant Press.” Media History, 15(3).
  • Hudson, Berkley and Ronald Ostman (2009). “ ‘A Desire to End These Things’: An Analytical History of John L. Spivak’s Photographic Portrayal of 1930s Georgia Chain Gangs,” Ostman is a Cornell University professor emeritus. Visual Communication Quarterly, 16, No. 4, 191-209.
  • Hudson, Berkley (2008). “News from Foreign Homelands and the New Heartland: Immigrant Press Flourishes in Turn of the Twentieth Century Missouri.” Gateway, the Missouri Historical Society journal. November 2008: 32-43.
  • Hudson, B. (2007). “O.N. Pruitt’s Possum Town: The ‘Modest Aspiration and Small Renown’ of a Mississippi Photographer.” Southern Cultures, 13(2).
  • Hudson, B. (2007). “A Mississippi Negro Farmer, His Mule, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt: Racial Portrayals of Sylvester Harris in the Black and White 1930s.” Journalism History, 32(4).

Journal Essay

  • Hudson, B. (Winter 2009). “To Privilege the Visual: An Alternative Approach to Media History.” American Journalism, 26(1).

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