Pulitzer Prize-Winning Exhibit Now on Display at the School

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Photojournalist Kim Komenich, MA ’07, to Discuss ‘Revolution Revisited’ on Sept. 21

By Chantel O’Neal
Master’s Student

Riza Casarmel in 1985

1985: Riza Casarmel, 10, spreads fertilizer in a sugar cane field at Hacienda Carmen, near Murcia, Negros Occidental. Her family members are sakadas, itinerant sugar workers. The life of a sakada was made more difficult under Marcos because his cronies exploited workers to keep sugar prices low.

Columbia, Mo. (Sept. 10, 2012) — “Revolution Revisited: The Philippine People Power Revolution Then and Now,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning work by Kim Komenich, MA ’07, is now on display in two locations at the Missouri School of Journalism.

The exhibit will be on display through Nov. 16 in the Angus and Betty McDougall Center for Photojournalism Studies in Lee Hills Hall and in the lobby of the Reynolds Journalism Institute.

Komenich was working as a photojournalist for the San Francisco Examiner when he took more than 28,000 photos during 1984-86 on four extended assignments in the Philippines, including the fall of the Marcos regime. Komenich received the Pulitzer Prize in 1987 for this body of work. Twenty-five years later, Komenich returned to find the people in those photographs and see the changes wrought by the revolution. He is now a multimedia and photojournalism professor at San José State University.

Riza Casarmel in 2011

2011: Riza Casarmel holds the youngest of her nine children in a field by her home near Murcia. “Our lives became better during Cory’s time; not as hard as before. In many ways, it’s just the same as before. If you don’t work, then you won’t be able to eat.”

Komenich will visit the School on Friday, Sept. 21, to discuss the exhibit, as well as the book and movie that comprise his “Revolution Revisited” project. His presentation will be at noon in Lee Hills 110. His talk is free and open to the public, as are the two exhibit locations.

For further information, please contact David Rees, chair of the photojournalism faculty.

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