Missouri Journalism Alumni to Examine Media and Politics in Washington at Sept. 23 Symposium

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How Secrecy, Partisanship and Technology Affects the Ability of Citizens to Stay Informed Will Be Discussed

Washington (Sept. 4, 2014) — Leaders in journalism, law and government will discuss how secrecy, partisanship and technology are affecting the ability of citizens to stay informed at “Power Capital: Missouri Alumni Examine Media and Politics in Washington.” The symposium will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 23, at the National Press Club.

Journalists and public officials in Washington are confronting a number of challenges that affect how well American citizens are informed, according to Barbara Cochran, the Curtis B. Hurley Chair in Public Affairs Reporting and director of the Washington program at the Missouri School of Journalism. The School and the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute are sponsors of the event.

Angela Greiling Keane

Angela Greiling Keane

Major Garrett

Major Garrett

Martin Frost

Martin Frost

The speakers – all graduates of the Missouri School of Journalism – include two White House correspondents, an investigative editor, a former congressman, an executive for a high-tech industry association and a First Amendment attorney:

  • Former Congressman Martin Frost
  • Major Garrett of CBS News
  • Angela Greiling Keane of Bloomberg News
  • Adora Andy Jenkins of the Information Technology Industry Council
  • Jeff Leen of the Washington Post
  • Kurt Wimmer of Covington & Burling

Dean Mills, dean of the School, will introduce the evening event. Cochran will moderate the program.

Adora Andy Jenkins

Adora Andy Jenkins

Jeff Leen

Jeff Leen

Kurt Wimmer

Kurt Wimmer

“The discussion comes at a time when we’re still feeling the aftershocks of Edward Snowden’s disclosures about the National Security Agency’s surveillance,” Cochran said. “Reporters and officials are at odds over access, and technology is transforming channels of communication. All of our speakers are well placed to discuss these thorny issues.”

The Hurley Symposium explores issues in public policy and journalism and was created through an endowment gift from Edgar A. and Lucile McLaughlin in the name of the Arkansas editor, Curtis B. Hurley, who encouraged McLaughlin to attend the Missouri School of Journalism.

The symposium will begin with registration and a cocktail reception at 6 p.m., followed by the panel at 7 p.m. at the National Press Club, 529 14th St., N.W., in Washington.

The complete program and registration form for “Power Capital: Missouri Alumni Examine Media and Politics in Washington”¬†are available on the RJI website. The Twitter hashtag for the event is #Hurley2014. For more information, contact Kristin Hodges at hodgeskd@missouri.edu or 202-662-7155.

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